Tag Archives: Elders

Walk of the Grand Vampire Peacock

13 Apr

Walk of the Grand Vampire Peacock

**Wow, this simple yet poignant article, kindled the fire within and encouraged me to spit-ball this short FB/Wordpress article.**

This is what, in my humble experienced opinion, the self-proclaimed, “Elders” of the Vampyre Subculture (Community) should be discussing and working towards (the attached article), during their “meetings,” Meetups, courts, or any venue they attend just so they can spew their drivel.

All this crap that all these “leaders” spend precious breathing time fretting and fighting over and for, is truly meaningless, and only exists so those self-entitled “important persons,” can feel like they matter. How any of these “chiefs” are still, after all their professed wisdom, so very blind, is, well, quite telling of the reality of that culture. How can they not know that all the outside validation of their claims (mostly without any proof) will never equate with true acceptance of self…that must always come from within.

Their very self-entitlement (whether voted into a meaningless position in a meaningless social court, house, or any group within that subculture, or not) is testament to their weakness, to their commitment of spreading poppycock and re-living their flash in the pan moment as if anything they have done or are doing will ever matter, in the grand scheme of what is actually important.

Should not Elders of any community be concerned for their people’s survival? And doesn’t that survival mean that those leaders should be concerned with the greater whole, the worldwide crux of what is truly happening? How can Elders of a group of self-labeled, cocks of the walk, claiming to be more enlightened, and in many cases, reveling in their belief that they are more important than Mundanes, be so unconcerned about what really matters? Worrying about parties and balls and walking the walk (of a douchebag extraordinaire actually), and thinking that they are walking the walk of the grand vampire peacock…nope…douchebag.

Man oh man, you need to wake the fuck up. The world has changed from just a few decades ago and is changing rapidly into its next stage of life. Do you, “Elders,” really think that your Houses and Courts and Social Media Groups, mean anything outside your own vanity and egos? All of which only indicates that your truest characters are lacking of meaningful substance and must use your ego to fool the outside world, but most of all, to hide from your very own truth.

Be mad. Keep your Black Veil over your face. Keep not transcending. Keep being a waste upon our Earth. It is all your choice. You are relics of self-serving double-talk and gibberish.

Apparently, you still don’t get it.

~Julia DarkRose Caples

 

 

Indigenous WisdomWisdom-fca2390d

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The Power of Kinship

16 Apr

Property of DarkRose Productions
Copyright 2014
By Julia DarkRose Ray
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*I am re-posting this article that I wrote last year. Some recent and very disturbing activity has been brought to my attention. Please remember and/or try to grasp this truth (not my truth but the truth of life). You cannot give yourself the Grand Sage of the Universe, or whatever and expect most people (the easily deluded will believe and follow almost anyone) to just accept this label that you have given yourself. Being an Elder is a right of passage. It is something that takes a lifetime to become and that is not even an assurance that you will become an Elder. The Elder of any community, tribe, clan, family, and so on, is someone that the community, tribe, family, and so on, have chosen to be said Elder. Most often, that label is not even applied. Being an Elder is something that is a part of the natural order of nature’s system. Be it human animal or any other animal family, community, tribe, and so on. You CANNOT sit around in an Internet group and just willy nilly decide that you are Elders and that all others should see you and respect you as such. You earn the esteemed and honorable role of an Elder through your life journey, through your life actions. Not from posting on FB or on any other Internet site. And yes, you must have actually lived a long life to achieve such an honorable and important role as Elder of your community, tribe, clan, family, and so on. All the ceremonies, diploma’s, and all the rest of the hullabaloo do not matter one iota. Please read the following article. I hope that it will clear up the major misconception that many seem to have about what a true Elder is.*
And with that, I bid you adieu…Goodnight Dark Angels Everywhere.

The Power of Kinship

For many Indian people, kinship was the key to the stability, integrity and survival of the community. For example, to be a nephew or a daughter was to possess a distinct role with well-defined rights and obligations to others. Those who came to villages as strangers-even if they were white captives-were often
adopted as “cousins” or “brothers”, which made their social position unambiguous and kept the integrity of the group intact.

A particular important role in society is played by elders. Traditionally, most child-rearing was done by grandparents, because it was considered that parents were too busy with daily life and did not yet possess enough accumulated wisdom to pass on to their children. Elders were, and are, the source of nurture and moral training, and, as storytellers, they are the repository of a people’s mythological and spiritual inheritance. The older generation, above all, is responsible for handing down the sacred traditions of a community.

Because Indian peoples often see their communities as an extension of the spirit-rich natural world, animals play a major part in Native American mythology and are believed to possess a close kinship with humans. In ancient times, it is said, before some break occurred that fixed them in their present identities, people and animals were indistinguishable and could change appearance at will.

Tricksters frequently appear in the form of animals to provide their human neighbours with valuable moral lessons. There are also numerous myths of marriages between humans and beasts. For example, in Alaska, the Aleut creation story relates how the first man and woman came down from the sky and had a son who played with a stone that became an island. Another of their sons and a female dog were then placed on the island and set afloat. This became Kodiak Island, and the Kodiak people who
inhabit it believe they are the descendants of that son and his dog-wife.

Call of the Clans

Many Native North Americans peoples are divided into kinship groups or extended families, known as clans. Although most tribes believe that animals and people are closely related, only a few clans see themselves as the direct descendants of an
animal spirit or totem, a word that anthropologists derived from the Ojibwe ‘odem’, which may be translated as “village”. Those clans that do have stories about how they came to have a totem animal. The Hopi say that after their emergence, they decided to play a name game while they hunted and moved across the
land in bands of relatives. Because the first band came across a bear skeleton, it decided to be called Bear Clan; another found a nest of spiders and became Spider
Clan. Similarly, the Iroquois peoples now have up to nine such groupings, including the Turtle Clan, the Bear Clan, and the Wolf Clan, each one which is matrilineal (based on tracing descent through the maternal line) and headed by a “clan mother”.

The origin may be even more direct: certain animals came back after their death (whether they had died of natural causes or had given their lives to a human hunter), stripped off their animal fur or feathers to look and act like humans, and then established their own clan or village among the people. For example, some
peoples of the Northwest Coast believe that their ancestors were animals that had landed on the beaches, taken off their animal guises, become human and established the various clans.

A totem animal may have assisted an ancestor in a hunt or helped him or her to find the way home. In other cases, a memeber of a clan may go on a specific quest to find an animal to adopt as the clan totem. Members of the Osage Spider Clan
relate that a young man once went into the forest on just such an expedition. He was following some deer tracks when he fell over a large spider’s web. The spider asked the man how he had come to trip over the web. He replied that he had been tracking a deer, because he was looking for a strong animal to be the symbol of his clan. The spider replied that, although he seemed to be a small, weak creature, he had the virtue of patience. Furthermore, the spider said, all creatures came to him sooner or later, just as the man had done. Impressed by these words, the man returned to his clan, which duly adopted the spider as its
totem.

Individuals who did not belong to a totem-based society or clan could develop their own relationship with a totem animal, which became their personal spirit guide. Clans and individuals were often thought to assume the characteristics of their spirit totem. For example, members of a Bear Clan might be said to possess great individual strength and ferocity, while those of a Wolf Clan might be said to be the ones who would seek out new things and places for the benefit of the group.

The relationships within and between clans might reflect those that are thought to exist between their real-life animal namesakes, implying that clans people share its characteristics. For example, in the past, the Winnebago usually chose chiefs
from the Thunderbird Clan, but it was members of the Bear Clan who policed the community, because bears are vigilant and all-seeing. Among the Cherokee, members of the Bird Clan acted as messengers, those of the Deer Clan served as runners and
men from the Wolf Clan fought as warriors.

I will end this short but important lesson here, for now.
It would be wise before anymore denizens of the vampire community go around quoting Dracula from Bram Stoker’s Dracula: “There is much to be learned from beasts.”
Perhaps those quoting this powerful wisdom should actually know about it and have experienced what they are quoting.

The Power of Kinship

9 Oct
This is a re-post of a little article that I wrote earlier this year. Before you read ‘The Power of Kinship’, I have included the post I had to make after I published my article, defending my usage of the label of Indian. I stand by my decision and by my own life experiences. Last time, in order to appease a former member of my inner circle, I apologized to her and any ‘Native Americans’ that I might have offended with my “racial slur”…NOT, it is in no way a racial slur. I am myself, Cherokee. I proudly call myself, Indian.
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Modern Names and Identities

The term “Indian” derives from Columbus’s famous blunder in mistaking for Asians the aboriginal Americans whom he encountered. As a name applied to the diversity of Native peoples, it still symbolizes for some a lack of understanding. To redress this wrong, at least symbolically, there are now a number of alternative names: Native Americans, Native Canadians, Native North Americans, aboriginal people, Native people and First Nations people. However, these names are largely used by officialdom and non-Native society. Most Native people, sensitive to their own specific identities, prefer to use tribal names, and many also freely call themselves Indians.

~ Julia DarkRose Ray
*****************************

The Power of Kinship

For many Indian people, kinship was the key to the stability, integrity and survival of the community. For example, to be a nephew or a daughter was to possess a distinct role with well-defined rights and obligations to others. Those who came to villages as strangers-even if they were white captives-were often adopted as “cousins” or “brothers”, which made their social position unambiguous and kept the integrity of the group intact.

A particular important role in society is played by elders (pay attention, vampire “community”). Traditionally, most child-rearing was done by grandparents, because it was considered that parents
were too busy with daily life and did not yet possess enough accumulated wisdom to pass on to their children. Elders were, and are, the source of nurture and moral training, and, as storytellers, they are the repository of a people’s mythological and spiritual inheritance. The older generation, above all, is responsible
for handing down the sacred traditions of a community. (Things that make you go hmmm).

Because Indian peoples often see their communities as an extension of the spirit-rich natural world, animals play a major part in Native American mythology and are believed to possess a close kinship with humans. In ancient times, it is said, before some break occurred that fixed them in their present identities, people and
animals were indistinguishable and could change appearance at will. Tricksters frequently appear in the form of animals to provide their human neighbours with valuable moral lessons. There are also numerous myths of marriages between humans and beasts. For example, in Alaska, the Aleut creation story relates how
the first man and woman came down from the sky and had a son who played with a stone that became an island. Another of their sons and a female dog were then placed on the island and set afloat. This became Kodiak Island, and the Kodiak people who inhabit it believe they are the descendants of that son and his dog-wife.

Call of the Clans

Many Native North Americans peoples are divided into kinship groups or extended families, known as clans. Although most tribes believe that animals and people are closely related, only a few clans see themselves as the direct descendants of an animal spirit or totem, a word that anthropologists derived from the Ojibwe
‘odem’, which may be translated as “village”. Those clans that do have stories about how they came to have a totem animal. The Hopi say that after their emergence, they decided to play a name game while they hunted and moved across the land in bands of relatives. Because the first band came across a bear skeleton, it decided to be called Bear Clan; another found a nest of spiders and became Spider Clan. Similarly, the Iroquois peoples now have up to nine such groupings, including the Turtle Clan, the Bear Clan, and the Wolf Clan, each one which is matrilineal (based on tracing descent through the maternal line) and headed by a “clan mother”.

The origin may be even more direct: certain animals came back after their death (whether they had died of natural causes or had given their lives to a human hunter), stripped off their animal fur or feathers to look and act like humans, and then established their own clan or village among the people. For example, some peoples of the Northwest Coast believe that their ancestors were animals that had landed on the beaches, taken off their animal guises, become human and established the various clans.

A totem animal may have assisted an ancestor in a hunt or helped him or her to find the way home. In other cases, a member of a clan may go on a specific quest to find an animal to adopt as the clan totem. Members of the Osage Spider Clan relate that a young man once went into the forest on just such an expedition. He
was following some deer tracks when he fell over a large spider’s web. The spider asked the man how he had come to trip over the web. He replied that he had been tracking a deer, because he was looking for a strong animal to be the symbol of his clan. The spider replied that, although he seemed to be a small, weak
creature, he had the virtue of patience. Furthermore, the spider said, all creatures came to him sooner or later, just as the man had done. Impressed by these words, the man returned to his clan, which duly adopted the spider as its totem.

Individuals who did not belong to a totem-based society or clan could develop their own relationship with a totem animal, which became their personal spirit guide. Clans and individuals were often thought to assume the characteristics of their spirit totem. For example, members of a Bear Clan might be said to possess great
individual strength and ferocity, while those of a Wolf Clan might be said to be the ones who would seek out new things and places for the benefit of the group.

The relationships within and between clans might reflect those that are thought to exist between their real-life animal namesakes, implying that clans people share its characteristics. For example, in the past, the Winnebago usually chose chiefs from the Thunderbird Clan, but it was members of the Bear Clan who policed the community, because bears are vigilant and all-seeing. Among the Cherokee, members of the Bird Clan acted as messengers, those of the Deer Clan served as runners and men from the Wolf Clan fought as warriors.

I will end this short but important lesson here, for now.
It would be wise before anymore denizens of the vampire community go around quoting Dracula from Bram Stoker’s Dracula: “There is much to be learned from beasts.”

Perhaps those quoting this powerful wisdom should actually know about it and have experienced what they are quoting.

You can read this article and absorb it at face value, or you can choose to read deeper and absorb my words of warning to not only the Vampire “Community” but to society in general. As always, everything you do and know and live in your life, is absolutely up to you, and you alone.

Thank you.

~Julia DarkRose Ray

The Power of Kinship

31 Mar

Property of The DarkRose Journal, 2013

The Power of Kinship
Warrior with wolf
For many Indian people, kinship was the key to the stability, integrity and survival of the community. For example, to be a nephew or a daughter was to possess a distinct role with well-defined rights and obligations to others. Those who came to villages as strangers-even if they were white captives-were often adopted as “cousins” or “brothers”, which made their social position unambiguous and kept the integrity of the group intact.

A particular important role in society is played by elders. Traditionally, most child-rearing was done by grandparents, because it was considered that parents were too busy with daily life and did not yet possess enough accumulated wisdom to pass on to their children. Elders were, and are, the source of nurture and moral training, and, as storytellers, they are the repository of a people’s mythological and spiritual inheritance. The older generation, above all, is responsible for handing down the sacred traditions of a community.

Because Indian peoples often see their communities as an extension of the spirit-rich natural world, animals play a major part in Native American mythology and are believed to possess a close kinship with humans. In ancient times, it is said, before some break occurred that fixed them in their present identities, people and animals were indistinguishable and could change appearance at will. Tricksters frequently appear in the form of animals to provide their human neighbours with valuable moral lessons. There are also numerous myths of marriages between humans and beasts. For example, in Alaska, the Aleut creation story relates how the first man and woman came down from the sky and had a son who played with a stone that became an island. another of their sons and a female dog were then placed on the island and set afloat. This became Kodiak Island, and the Kodiak people who inhabit it believe they are the descendants of that son and his dog-wife.

Call of the Clans

Many Native North Americans peoples are divided into kinship groups or extended families, known as clans. Although most tribes believe that animals and people are closely related, only a few clans see themselves as the direct descendants of an animal spirit or totem, a word that anthropologists derived from the Ojibwe ‘odem’, which may be translated as “village”. Those clans that do have stories about how they came to have a totem animal. The Hopi say that after their emergence, they decided to play a name game while they hunted and moved across the land in bands of relatives. Because the first band came across a bear skeleton, it decided to be called Bear Clan; another found a nest of spiders and became Spider Clan. Similarly, the Iroquois peoples now have up to nine such groupings, including the Turtle Clan, the Bear Clan, and the Wolf Clan, each one which is matrilineal (based on tracing descent through the maternal line) and headed by a “clan mother”.

The origin may be even more direct: certain animals came back after their death (whether they had died of natural causes or had given their lives to a human hunter), stripped off their animal fur or feathers to look and act like humans, and then established their own clan or village among the people. For example, some peoples of the Northwest Coast believe that their ancestors were animals that had landed on the beaches, taken off their animal guises, become human and established the various clans.

A totem animal may have assisted an ancestor in a hunt or helped him or her to find the way home. In other cases, a memeber of a clan may go on a specific quest to find an animal to adopt as the clan totem. Members of the Osage Spider Clan relate that a young man once went into the forest on just such an expedition. He was following some deer tracks when he fell over a large spider’s web. The spider asked the man how he had come to trip over the web. He replied that he had been tracking a deer, because he was looking for a strong animal to be the symbol of his clan. The spider replied that, although he seemed to be a small, weak creature, he had the virtue of patience. Furthermore, the spider said, all creatures came to him sooner or later, just as the man had done. Impressed by these words, the man returned to his clan, which duly adopted the spider as its totem.

Individuals who did not belong to a totem-based society or clan could develop their own relationship with a totem animal, which became their personal spirit guide.

Clans and individuals were often thought to assume the characteristics of their spirit totem. For example, members of a Bear Clan might be said to possess great individual strength and ferocity, while those of a Wolf Clan might be said to be the ones who would seek out new things and places for the benefit of the group.

The relationships within and between clans might reflect those that are thought to exist between their real-life animal namesakes, implying that clanspeople share its characteristics. For example, in the past, the Winnebago usually chose chiefs from the Thunderbird Clan, but it was members of the Bear Clan who policed the community, because bears are vigilant and all-seeing. Among the Cherokee, members of the Bird Clan acted as messengers, those of the Deer Clan served as runners and men from the Wolf Clan fought as warriors.

I will end this short but important lesson here, for now.
It would be wise before anymore denizens of the vampire community go around quoting Dracula from Bram Stoker’s Dracula: “There is much to be learned from beasts.”
Perhaps those quoting this powerful wisdom should actually know about it and have experienced what they are quoting.

~DarkRose

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